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Freakonomics Radio

Freakonomics Radio

771 EPISODE · 48 SUBSCRIBERS

Freakonomics co-author Stephen J. Dubner uncovers the hidden side of everything. Why is it safer to fly in an airplane than drive a car? How do we decide whom to marry? Why is the media so full of bad news? Also: things you never knew you wanted to know about wolves, bananas, pollution, search engines, and the quirks of human behavior. Join the Freakonomics Radio Plus membership program for weekly member-only episodes of Freakonomics Radio. You’ll also get every show in our network without ads. To sign up, visit our show page on Apple Podcasts or go to freakonomics.com/plus.

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596. Farewell to a Generational Talent

596. Farewell to a Generational Talent

Freakonomics Radio

Daniel Kahneman left his mark on academia (and the real world) in countless ways. A group of his friends and colleagues recently gathered in Chicago to reflect on this legacy — and we were there, with microphones.   SOURCES: Maya Bar-Hillel, professor emeritus of psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Shane Frederick, professor of marketing at the Yale School of Management. Thomas Gilovich, professor of psychology at Cornell University. Matt Killingsworth, senior fellow at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Barbara Mellers, professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Eldar Shafir, director of the Kahneman-Treisman Center for Behavioral Science & Public Policy at Princeton University. Richard Thaler, professor of behavioral science and economics at the University of Chicago.   RESOURCES: "Experienced Well-Being Rises With Income, Even Above $75,000 Per Year," by Matthew A. Killingsworth (PNAS, 2021). "The False Allure of Fast Lures," by Yigal Attali and Maya Bar-Hillel (Judgment and Decision Making, 2020). "Learning Psychology From Riddles: The Case of Stumpers," by Maya Bar-Hillel and Tom Noah (Judgment and Decision Making, 2018). Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Daniel Kahneman (2011). "High Income Improves Evaluation of Life but Not Emotional Well-Being," by Daniel Kahneman and Angus Deaton (PNAS, 2010). "Varieties of Regret: A Debate and Partial Resolution," by Thomas Gilovich, Victoria Husted Medvec, and Daniel Kahneman (Psychological Review, 1998). "Some Counterfactual Determinants of Satisfaction and Regret," by Thomas Gilovich and Victoria Husted Medvec (What Might Have Been: The Social Psychology of Counterfactual Thinking, 1995).   EXTRAS: "Remembering Daniel Kahneman," by People I (Mostly) Admire (2024). "Academic Fraud," series by Freakonomics Radio (2021). "Here’s Why All Your Projects Are Always Late — and What to Do About It," by Freakonomics Radio (2018). "The Men Who Started a Thinking Revolution," by Freakonomics Radio (2017).

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595. Why Don't We Have Better Candidates for President?

595. Why Don't We Have Better Candidates for President?

Freakonomics Radio

American politics is trapped in a duopoly, with two all-powerful parties colluding to stifle competition. We revisit a 2018 episode to explain how the political industry works, and talk to a reformer (and former presidential candidate) who is pushing for change.   SOURCES: Katherine Gehl, former president and C.E.O. of Gehl Foods. Michael Porter, professor at Harvard Business School. Andrew Yang, co-chair of the Forward Party and former U.S. presidential candidate.   RESOURCES: "Why U.S. Politics Is Broken — and How to Fix It," by Andrew Yang (TED, 2024). The Politics Industry: How Political Innovation Can Break Partisan Gridlock and Save Our Democracy, by Michael Porter and Katherine Gehl (2020). “Why Competition in the Politics Industry is Failing America,” Katherine Gehl and Michael Porter (Harvard Business School, 2017). “Stronger Parties, Stronger Democracy: Rethinking Reform,” by Ian Vandewalker and  Daniel I. Weiner (Brennan Center for Justice, 2015). On Competition, by Michael Porter (2008). Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors, by Michael Porter (1980).   EXTRAS: "Andrew Yang Is Not Giving Up on Politics — or the U.S. — Yet," by People I (Mostly) Admire (2021). "The Future of New York City Is in Question. Could Andrew Yang Be the Answer?" by Freakonomics Radio (2021). "Why Is This Man Running for President? (Update)," by Freakonomics Radio (2019). “Ten Ideas to Make Politics Less Rotten,” Freakonomics Radio (2016).

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594. Your Brand’s Spokesperson Just Got Arrested — Now What?

594. Your Brand’s Spokesperson Just Got Arrested — Now What?

Freakonomics Radio

It’s hard to know whether the benefits of hiring a celebrity are worth the risk. We dig into one gruesome story of an endorsement gone wrong, and find a surprising result.   SOURCES: John Cawley, professor of economics at Cornell University. Elizabeth (Zab) Johnson, executive director and senior fellow with the Wharton Neuroscience Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania. Alvin Roth, professor of economics at Stanford University.   RESOURCES: "Kanye and Adidas: Money, Misconduct and the Price of Appeasement," by Megan Twohey (The New York Times, 2023). "The Role of Repugnance in Markets: How the Jared Fogle Scandal Affected Patronage of Subway," by John Cawley, Julia Eddelbuettel, Scott Cunningham, Matthew D. Eisenberg, Alan D. Mathios, and Rosemary J. Avery (NBER Working Paper, 2023). "How Celebrity Status and Gaze Direction in Ads Drive Visual Attention to Shape Consumer Decisions," by Simone D'Ambrogio, Noah Werksman, Michael L. Platt, and Elizabeth Johnson (Psychology & Marketing, 2022). "Consumer Responses to Firms’ Voluntary Disclosure of Information: Evidence from Calorie Labeling by Starbucks," by Rosemary Avery, John Cawley, Julia Eddelbuettel, Matthew D. Eisenberg, Charlie Mann, and Alan D. Mathios (NBER Working Paper, 2021). "Consumer Heterogeneity and Paid Search Effectiveness: A Large Scale Field Experiment," by Thomas Blake, Chris Nosko, and Steven Tadelis (NBER Working Paper, 2014). "The Economics of Obesity," by John Cawley (The Reporter, 2013). "Repugnance as a Constraint on Markets," by Alvin Roth (Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2007).   EXTRAS: "Does Advertising Actually Work? (Part 2: Digital)," by Freakonomics Radio (2020). "Does Advertising Actually Work? (Part 1: TV)," by Freakonomics Radio (2020).

43 Menit
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